Disney Dudes' Dicks: What Your Favorite Princes Look Like Naked

Chill Inducing Song of the Day.

(Source: Spotify)

Probably the most disturbing kid entertainment I’ve seen this year. #Marvel #DC #SantaClaus #Spiderman #Batman #Hulk #Wolverine #Nope

Probably the most disturbing kid entertainment I’ve seen this year. #Marvel #DC #SantaClaus #Spiderman #Batman #Hulk #Wolverine #Nope

The world has a serious shortage of both logic and kindness.

Haruki Murakami, 1Q84  (via yudoku)

(Source: larmoyante)

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public 
BGLH writes:
“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.
“WOW. Really?” I replied.
I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.
With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.
Read more here.

heyfranhey:

History Lesson || Why Women Of Color In The 1800s Were Banned From Wearing Their Hair Out In Public

BGLH writes:

“Did you know that in late 18th century Louisiana, black and multiracial women were ordered to cover their hair in public?” My sister asked me.

“WOW. Really?” I replied.

I’d probably heard of this in one of my black studies classes in undergrad, but who remembers everything they’ve been taught? Besides, this information felt instantly relevant and I was absolutely intrigued.

With a little digging I found that there was in fact a “law” of sorts that demanded women of color in Louisiana to cover their hair with a fabric cloth starting in 1789 as a part of what was called the Bando du buen gobierno (Edict for Good Government).  What these rules were meant to do was try to curtail the growing influence of the free black population and keep the social order of the time. The edict included sections specifically about the changing of certain “unacceptable” behaviors of the free black women in the colony including putting an end to what he and others believed to be the overly ostentatious hairstyles of these ladies which drew the attention of white men, and the jealousy of white women. These rules are called the “Tignon Laws” A tignon (pronounced “tiyon”) is a headdress.

Read more here.

diasporadash:

witchsistah:

A representation of a Black family where the wife isn’t lighter than her husband and the little girl isn’t biracial.

THIS.

diasporadash:

witchsistah:

A representation of a Black family where the wife isn’t lighter than her husband and the little girl isn’t biracial.

THIS.

(Source: myadventuretimes)

ttfkagb:

sabacc:

THERE’S NOT EVEN ANY WIND INDOORS, HIS COAT JUST DOES THAT OUT OF RESPECT

Captain America: The Winter Soldier review by 

This review is a thing of beauty.

vand-etta asked
Why do black people straighten their hair if non-black people can't get corn row/ box braid/ whatever you consider a "black" hairstyle

sablevenus:

rabbitglitter:

lordbape:

why do white people always try to make this non-point false equivalence when they know these are two completely different realities that don’t compare on any plane whatsoever

white people not only make black people hate their hair at an individual emotional level but literally at a systemic level in which black people are and have been for the last century unable to get jobs, attend colleges, enlist in the armed forces, etc. because of the treatment of their natural hair. there literally is nothing white people have to compare…

white people are not getting box braids because they feel pressured to, or out of fear that they won’t have access to a job or anything, but instead because they know it’s an “edgy black people thing” that they’re doing to be counter culture and subversive. there is literally no pressure on earth for anyone INCLUDING BLACK PEOPLE to worship or utilize Black hairstyles or Black hair in its natural state and you fucking know it. It’s literally the complete opposite for white hair. grow up

white people are not gelling down baby hairs for social mobility or financial security or comfort or assimilation.

credit to black—lamb

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  • gradientlair:

    12 year old Vanessa VanDyke is being threatened with expulsion from Faith Christian Academy in Orlando unless she cuts her natural hair.

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Read the ads

"MEN WHO GO PLACES" "WAS IT HER RESUME OR HER RELAXER?" white people don’t have ads telling them "you will not be successful in life unless you have cornrows and box braids with gelled down baby hairs" because that isn’t the case. address this in the context of reality, maybe???

All of this. ALL OF THIS. READ THIS ^^^^^^

White people didn’t invent straight hair either. There are Black people with straight hair. That’s not a “White style”.

Because ALL of this needs to be on everyone’s page.